Are your reeds in good hands?
So, professionals say you should be practicing four hours a day. And I find it hard to sit down and practice for an hour or so. Unless I have a lot of music to go through, and then I just feel unproductive with my practice session. What are some tips to keep up a productive practice session, and to have enough motivation for multiple sessions a day? If you have any!

theclarinetcorner:

In all honesty, it comes down to consistent and quality practice. Consistent in the sense that you have at least a schedule down every week that is repetitious and “consistent” with your scheduling of the prior week. That being said, you don’t always have to practice 8 hours a day but if you’re going to do a quantity of practice. You may as well make it quality practice.

Focus on one thing in each session.

For instance:
1 hour of long tones
1 hour of scales, intervals and arpeggios and technique
1 hour of excerpts, analyzation of Fingerings, dynamics and entrances
1 hour of repertoire

The first two hours could either be done back to back or separate. The goal is to also improve tongue speed and fluidity with the fingers. But that example is based on a four hour practice regiment but I would probably work in reed work. Getting my reeds conditioned and either eliminating or replenishing reed life.

Oscar

A clean reed is a happy reed.

Cleaning your reeds can help extend the life and sound of them which, in the long run, will save you money.

I have a Vandoren reed resurfacer or a small square mirror I like to use as a flat surface when doing so. On the reed resurfacer I use the flat, non-abrasive side of course.

I soak my reeds for about a minute or two in like warm water.

Pull it out and lay it on the surface and kind of run my nail down the vamp. You’ll notice the discolour leave the cane.

The great thing this does is, if you’re going to practice, rehearse or perform. It conditions it to have sealed pores and if it is a good reed. It should last you a good run of songs.

In long performances, I like to use multiple reeds. Rotating, if you will.

After the performance I will do the cleaning again. Your spit breaks the cane down so removing as much of it as possible helps slow the deterioration of this dense grass we call “reeds”.

Hope this helps!

Oscar

Selmer Paris, the only way to go;)

fyeahclarinet:

woodwindofmassdestruction:

Reeds by mbshane on Flickr.

is it just me, or do new reeds taste good? 

fyeahclarinet:

woodwindofmassdestruction:

Reeds by mbshane on Flickr.

is it just me, or do new reeds taste good? 

little-miss-shiny:

musicalwind:

Smh..reeds

I remember one year I bought a Legere reed for marching band. My band director almost killed me.

little-miss-shiny:

musicalwind:

Smh..reeds

I remember one year I bought a Legere reed for marching band. My band director almost killed me.

justbriann:

theclarinetcorner:

Clarinettissimo 2013: Things you’ll see there
Selmer Paris 28 Contrabass Clarinet
Bore Diameter: 33.90 mm
Silver Plated Keys
Pitch: 442mHz
Rosewood Body, Boehm System(18 keys, 7 rings)
Articulated G#, Eb lever, automatic octave key, adjustable neck for tuning. Adjustable peg, silver plated brass bell
Low C
Key: Bb
Sean Osborn is hosting his annual Clarinettissimo at Seattle Pacific University this weekend of Oct. 6th and 7th. Bill Jackson of Yamaha will be there. Clarinets and other products, accessories, music and more will be available to browse, test play and purchase!
Hope to see any of you there :]
I’ve met people from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Boston, Arizona and Oregon and they still keep coming. It will definitely be worth your while and hope if you can’t make it this year, you’ll go in the following years!
Oscar

Our school has one and it’s beautiful.

justbriann:

theclarinetcorner:

Clarinettissimo 2013: Things you’ll see there

Selmer Paris 28 Contrabass Clarinet

Bore Diameter: 33.90 mm

Silver Plated Keys

Pitch: 442mHz

Rosewood Body, Boehm System(18 keys, 7 rings)

Articulated G#, Eb lever, automatic octave key, adjustable neck for tuning. Adjustable peg, silver plated brass bell

Low C

Key: Bb

Sean Osborn is hosting his annual Clarinettissimo at Seattle Pacific University this weekend of Oct. 6th and 7th. Bill Jackson of Yamaha will be there. Clarinets and other products, accessories, music and more will be available to browse, test play and purchase!

Hope to see any of you there :]

I’ve met people from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Boston, Arizona and Oregon and they still keep coming. It will definitely be worth your while and hope if you can’t make it this year, you’ll go in the following years!

Oscar

Our school has one and it’s beautiful.

I am in trouble. :( I seem to have hit a wall and no matter what I do I can't break it down. I have college auditions on the 2nd, but the pieces I want to play are no where near performance ready. I've been practicing but I can't practice very long without getting fatigued. Do you have practice tips for me?
Anonymous

Your embouchure is made up of muscles like any muscles, yes they need to be worked out, but you also need to give them time to recover. Make sure you’re not overtaxing them and playing in front of a mirror is a great way to see what you’re actually doing with your face.

Hope this helps,

Lilio :D

lilio:

Picinetophone

lilio:

Picinetophone

Who makes the best baroque oboe reeds for Denner in "pro" style and why and which gouger and tip and staple combination eventually works for the Toshi Denner? Let's also get into the little bocals and who makes them and how? Many kind regards from Australia. Joel Marangella, 1st Oboe Solo, West Australia
Anonymous

I’m not sure. I’ll have to find someone who knows. Hopefully someone who follows this blog can answer.

Oscar

lilio:

SAC-RI-FICE, SAC-RI-FICE, SAC-RI-FICE!!!

lilio:

SAC-RI-FICE, SAC-RI-FICE, SAC-RI-FICE!!!